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The International Aerial Robotics Competition is the longest running collegiate aerial robotics challenge in the world. Entering its third decade of advancing the state of the art in autonomous aerial robotic behavior, the competition continues to tackle challenges that are currently impossible for any flying robots owned by government or industry.

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collapse Technology Readiness Level demonstrated at the 2016 IARC
30 September, 2016. A summary video, performance awards, and notable performance information for the 2016 IARC are now available at the "read more" link.
collapse Create 2 Ground Robot Control Instructions Available
6 May, 2016. Instructions are now available for controlling the new iRobot Create 2 ground robots. A new board design, build instructions, and associated software are available at the link. The top touch paddle design is also available.
collapse 2016 Competition Dates
20 March, 2016. The American Venue competition is scheduled for August 2-4. The competition is set for the Zelnak Training Center on the campus of the Georgia Institute of Technology and the symposium is at the Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons. The Asia/Pacific competition is scheduled for September 22-25 in Beijing, China. More details can be found at the link.
collapse DJI Announces Top Performer Awards
19 November, 2015. Congratulations to the top performers in the 2015 edition of the International Aerial Robotics Competition (IARC). Da-Jiang Innovations Science and Technology Co., Ltd. (“DJI”), with headquarters in Shenzhen China, is a world leader in computer-stabilized vertical lift aerial camera platforms. DJI is awarding brand new Matrice 100 flight platforms and flight controller software developers’ kits (SDK) with a total value of approximately USD$5,000 to the six top performing teams at the American and Asia/Pacific Venues (three per venue).
collapse 2015 American Venue IARC Summary
18 August, 2015. The aerial robot from École Polytechnique de Montréal flew autonomously and continuously tracked one of the ground target robots as it autonomously changed trajectories and eventually moved across the Green line. No attempt was made by the École Polytechnique de Montréal aerial robot to influence the target robot trajectories this year. All of the teams that flew, did so fully autonomously. A number of new and prospective teams were represented at the American Venue this year, having sent observers in anticipation of first flights in 2016.

  • Best Paper Award: University of Michigan
  • Best Presentation Award: École Polytechnique de Montréal
  • Best Systems Integration Award: École Polytechnique de Montréal
  • Most Innovative Design Award: Kennesaw State University
collapse 2014 IARC Results
15 August, 2014. For the 23rd year in a row, university teams have come together to do the impossible with autonomous aerial vehicles. This was the first year of “Mission 7″ which tasked collegiate teams to build a system utilizing unmanned air vehicles to avoid moving obstacles and herd a large number of free running ground robots across a goal line while also preventing them from leaving the 20 meter by 20 meter field. This was all done autonomously without the aid of GPS. (continued)
expand The AUVSI Foundation IARC Announces Mission 7
Mission 73 September, 2013. The 7th Mission of the AUVSI Foundation's International Aerial Robotics Competition (IARC) will begin in 2014 and will again occur nearly simultaneously at the Asia/Pacific and American Venues. This marks the 23rd year of the world's premier collegiate robotics competition. The rules and resources for Mission 7 have been posted.
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Would your organization like to learn more about the AUVSI Foundation, the IARC, or autonomous aerial robotics? The IARC organizer or a judge can come to your location for a presentation, seminar, or short course.
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